World Athlete of the Year 2021 – spotlight on the women’s nominees

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Valarie Allman (USA) discus

In 2021 the US thrower built on the breakthrough she made last year to establish herself as the world’s No.1 in the discus.

She broached the 70-metre line in the qualifying round of the US Trials and then secured the title one day later with 69.92m. Allman then earned Olympic gold in Tokyo with her opening-round effort of 68.98m, ultimately winning by more than two metres. She then went on to win the Wanda Diamond League title, followed three days later by a world-leading throw of 71.16m, breaking the long-standing North American record.

In total, Allman won nine of her 12 competitions in 2021 and ended the year with 13 of the top 16 throws in the world, all of them beyond 68 metres.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn (PUR) 100m hurdles

The Puerto Rican went undefeated for the duration of the 2021 season in all 15 100m hurdles races that she finished, including heats.

Her streak included winning Olympic gold in 12.37, having set an Olympic record of 12.26 in the semifinals. She also picked up victories at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Florence and the Continental Tour Gold meetings in Eugene, Hengelo and Szekesfehervar.

Her world-leading 12.26 clocking moves her to equal fourth on the world all-time list. She ends 2021 with the five fastest times in the world this year, all of them inside 12.40.

Sydney McLaughlin (USA) 400m hurdles

The uber-talented US athlete came of age in 2021, securing her first senior global title and setting two world records along the way.

Having started her season with a handful of races in the 100m hurdles, reducing her best to 12.65, McLaughlin opened her 400m hurdles campaign with a 52.83 clocking in Nashville – the fastest season opener in history for the event. It provided a small taste of what was to come as she went on to win the US Olympic Trials in a world record of 51.90, producing the first sub-52-second time in history to defeat world champion Dalilah Muhammad.

The pair faced off again in the Olympic final in another mouth-watering clash, and once again the world record fell as McLaughlin triumphed in 51.46. She added another gold medal to her collection three days later as part of the victorious USA 4x400m squad.

Shaunae Miller-Uibo (BAH) 200m and 400m

A mid-season change of plans paid dividends for the Bahamian sprinter.

Having started the year by focusing on the 200m, Miller-Uibo gravitated back towards her specialist event, the 400m, as the season went on. She contested both disciplines at the Olympics and reached the finals of both, but she excelled over one lap of the track.

Producing the race of her life, Miller-Uibo stopped the clock at 48.36 to successfully defend her Olympic title. Not only was her time a world-leading mark, it was also an improvement on her own continental record.

Athing Mu (USA) 400m and 800m

The 19-year-old US athlete achieved more in one season than what many older and experienced athletes achieve in a lifetime.

At the start of the year, Mu set a world U20 indoor record of 1:58.40 for 800m. Outdoors, she broke 50 seconds for 400m three times, topped by a North American U20 record of 49.57, but it was over 800m where she made a name for herself. Having won the US Trials with a world-leading 1:56.07, she went even faster at the Tokyo Games, winning gold in 1:55.21. Four days later, she anchored the USA to victory in the 4x400m with a 48.32 split, producing a winning time of 3:16.85 – the fastest in the world for 28 years.

She ended her season with victory at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Eugene in a world-leading 1:55.04, once again breaking her own North American U20 record.

Elaine Thompson-Herah (JAM) 100m and 200m

In 2021 the Jamaican enjoyed one of the finest sprint seasons in history.

She clocked 10.78 over 100m at an early season meeting in Clermont, but she started to move up a gear in July when winning in Szekesfehervar in 10.71. By the time she reached the Olympics, Thompson-Herah was in a class of her own as she retained her 100m and 200m titles in 10.61 and 21.53. She added another gold medal to her collection in the 4x100m, which she and her Jamaican teammates won in a national record of 41.02.

In her first race after the Olympics, she won the 100m in Eugene in a world-leading 10.54. She now ranks second on the world all-time lists for the 100m and 200m.

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SOURCE: WORLD ATHLETICS

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

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